Tsukemono Japanese Pickle

I would like to thank those of you who joined my daughter and me at Fernbrook Farms CSA on Saturday for the “Probiotic Preservation” Class! It was a nice crowd and people asked a lot of great questions.

One of the recipes I made that day was a take on a fermented Japanese pickle called Tsukemono. I did not have copies of the recipe with me, and thought I had posted it on the blog earlier.

I have used a variety of vegetables for this ferment: Chinese (napa) cabbage (one head, shredded), regular cabbage (one head, shredded), baby bok choi (a big bowl full), collard greens (shredded), grated kohlrabi (two big bulbs, peeled), grated carrots (about 5 medium), and grated hakurei turnips (about 10 medium).

  • Prepped vegetable of choice
  • 2-3 finely sliced green onion
  • 2 T naturally fermented soy sauce
  • the juice of one lemon*
  • 1 t of sea salt
  • ¼ C whey (if you don’t have whey, just use an extra teaspoon of salt)
  • 2 T toasted sesame oil
  1. In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients, EXCEPT the sesame oil. If you are using cabbage, collards or any of the root vegetables, use a pounder and pound until juices begin to appear. Regular cabbage may take about 5 minutes, Chinese cabbage may only take two or three.
  2. Pack into a clean mason jar, leaving 1 inch of head space at the top. Using the pounder, press the vegetables down until they are below the level of the liquid.
  3. Secure the lid and leave out on a counter for 2 – 3 days, until bubble begin to form. Before moving to cold storage, add the toasted sesame oil and stir through. Repack the jar and put in cold storage.
  4. Toasted sesame seeds make a nice addition to this pickle when it is served.

Easy Salsa That’s Good for Your Gut

I have already posted my recipe for canned salsa, but I have two others, both using that age-old preservation process I call Probiotic Preservation.  To learn more about it, see my earlier blog post.

The first is a tomato recipe that tastes much like the salsa in the canned recipe.

Red Salsa

  • 5-6 medium tomatoes
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 sweet pepper, small dice
  • 1 jalepeno pepper, sliced (seeds or no seeds – hotness is up to you!)
  • 1 poblano pepper, sliced (see above)
  • 1 stalk celery, small dice
  • 1 T honey or REAL maple syrup
  • 1/3 C sea salt
  • ¼ C whey

Scald and peel the tomatoes.  Cut into bite size pieces and put in a bowl.  Put the onion in a sieve and run under hot water for about a minute.  Add to the bowl.  Sprinkle with the salt and mix and let stand for about three hours.  Drain.  Add the remaining ingredients and mix well.  Pack into jars and close lids.  Leave in at room temperature for 2-3 days.  Transfer to cold storage.

Note:  If you do not have whey available, add 1T of salt  when you add the remaining ingredients.

Green Salsa

  • 1 quart tomatillos, husked and washed and chopped
  • 1 medium onion, rough chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, fine chopped
  • 1 large bunch cilantro, fine chopped, stems included
  • 1 sweet pepper, small dice
  • hot peppers to taste
  • 1/3 C sea salt
  • 1/4 C whey
  1. Combine the tomatillos and onions in a non-reactive bowl and sprinkle with the salt.  Let stand about 20 minutes and then drain.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients.
  3. Pack into jars and close lids.  Leave in a warm place for 2-3 days.  Transfer to cold storage.
  4. When you are ready to eat the salsa, you can serve it as is, or mix it with some fresh chopped red tomatoes, and/or chopped mangos.
    Note:  If you do not have whey available, add 1T of salt  when you add the remaining ingredients.

Another note:  If you put too many hot peppers in the salsa, adding a fruit like mango or apple right before you serve it can cut down the heat with the sweet.

DO NOT ADD THE FRUIT BEFORE YOU FERMENT THIS!  Yes, I tried that once.  The salsa molded halfway down the jar in about two weeks.

I can’t tell you how long these will hold up in cold storage because they doesn’t stick around in our house more than a month or two.  Figure it this way — the tomatoes come in just as football season is starting.

Simple Sauerkraut

One of the easiest things to make is sauerkraut.  I always liked sauerkraut on bratwursts, but I can honestly say, in the past I would never have choosen it as a side dish.

When I started lacto-fermenting foods, this is where I started.  I needed a use for the whey leftover from yogurt making.  At the time I didn’t have chickens, and I couldn’t stand the wastefulness of pouring it down the drain.  I quickly got hooked on lacto-fermenting, and got pretty good at it.  We now have lacto-fermented foods that vary from pickles (see earlier post) to kim-chee (coming soon).  As we get vegetables from our CSA at Fernbrook Farm, I use what is left from the week before and come up with new lacto-fermented salads and combinations.

I started teaching classes on lacto-fermentation in 2010.  One day, while speaking to my sister about what I was doing, she commented that lacto-fermentation sounded “clunky and unappealing.”  That was when I started to refer to it as Probiotic Preservation.  The alliteration appeals to my English Major.  The use of the term probiotic makes the preservation technique more accessible, as many people are now familiar with it because it is used so frequently as a marketing tool.

Sauerkraut

  •  One medium head of cabbage, shredded
  • One medium carrot, shredded
  • One small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 t caraway seeds (optional)
  • 1 T salt
  • 1/4 C Whey (if it is not available increase salt to 2 T)
  1. Mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl. I use a 4-quart, stainless steel pot.  With a pounder (a plunger from your grinder, a meat pounder, or the end of a boiled brick), pound the mixture for about 8 – 10 minutes, until juices are formed.
  2. Pack the cabbage into clean glass jars or a crock.  Be sure that the vegetables are below the surface of the juices!
  3. If you are using jars: Put the lids on the jars and place in a warm spot for 2-3days.  When bubbles form, move to cold storage.
  4. If you are using a crock:  Weight the top of the cabbage with a plate that fits inside the crock and a boiled brick.  Cover the top with cheesecloth to keep out dust and dirt.  Place the crock in a warm spot for 2-3 days.  Check the top of the brine for scum.  If scum has formed, scrape it off of the top of the brine before moving the kraut to cold storage.

We are just finishing our last jar of kraut from last fall.  It kept beautifully for 5 months.  Keep in mind that this is not heat processed and cannot be stored in a pantry with canned foods.  It must be cold-stored at a temperature below 50 degrees.

We keep our l-f vegetables in an old refrigerator we have in our mudroom that is set on the “vacation” setting.

  • Sauerkraut (traditionalnourishment.wordpress.com)