Focus on One: Perfect Pumpkin Pie

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Happy November.  It has been a while since I have had the time to write anything.  The opening of school has been very hectic, and as the first marking period wound down, I realized that in addition to other things I didn’t do this fall because I was so busy with school work, I hadn’t written a blog entry in months.  Focus on one?  Writing blog entries again?  Well, it IS November, and Thanksgiving is a mere 12 days away, so Focus on One: making the perfect pumpkin pie.  For years, I worked on perfecting my pumpkin pie and I think that after all of this time, I have finally got it down.

There are two things that make a pumpkin pie really great: one is using a mix of fresh pumpkin and butternut squash puree and the other is the pie crust.  I will start with the crust.  Excellent pie crust results from very cold fat and not over mixing the dough.  How do you do that?  Make the crust mixture in advance and put it in the freezer.  I actually make batches of the crust mix and freeze it in plastic bags with 1 cup of mix in each bag.  And the trick to not over-rolling your dough is to use a pastry cloth and a pin sock and NEVER wash them.  “Yuck,” you say.  Store the pastry cloth and the pin sock in a freezer bag in the freezer.  It is like having a non-stick pastry cloth and I can roll out a very thin pie crust.  Another question is about the fat to use in the pie crust mix.  Traditionally, people used lard in pie crust because it creates a much flakier crust.  However, many people use butter because it has a better flavor, but the texture of the crust is more like shortbread than pie crust and it is difficult to roll thin.

In “Recycle Those Pumpkins,” I give instructions to bake-off your Jack-O-Lanterns.  You can use the same technique to bake off any type of squash, and store it in the same way.  I use the frozen puree in soups, casseroles, and custards.  The reason I like to use a combination of pumpkin and butternut squash for my pie custard is that the butternut adds a beautiful color to the finished product.  Also, if you are using Jack-o-lantern pumpkin instead of pie pumpkin, it will improve the flavor.  What is the difference between a pie pumpkin and a jack-o-lantern pumpkin?  J-O-L pumpkin seeds are chosen for hardiness and size.  Everyone wants a nice big pumpkin to carve, and one that won’t go soft and moldy in a day.  Pie pumpkins do not store as well because they have a higher sugar content, softer flesh, and a softer outer shell.  The nice thing about pie pumpkins is that they are available at local farmer’s markets right now, along with other great fall veggies.

Elements of the perfect pumpkin pie:

Pie Crust Mix Recipe:

In a large bowl, mix together:

  • 6 Cups All-Purpose flour
  • 1 Tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

Cut in 1 pound of fat (lard, butter, shortening (not really recommended), or some combination of two or three) at room temperature until it makes pebbles.  Store in the freezer until ready to use.

Once the crust mix is frozen, you can use it.  For one crust pies, use 1 Cup of mix and add 3 Tablespoons of ice water.  Stir just until it all comes together.  For two crust pies, use 2 cups of the mix with 1/3 Cup ice water.

To roll out a pie crust, lightly flour a pastry cloth and a pin sleeve.  Make a ball out of the dough and squash it flat with your hand.  Roll the dough into a circle.  To transfer to the pie plat, fold it in quarters and slip the pie plate under the pie crust, then unfold it.  Give the crust a lot of slack and gently push it into the bottom edges of the pan.  If you tear it, just take some dough from the excess around the edges and patch it.  No one can see the bottom of the pie.  Just make sure to seal it up so the filling doesn’t leak through.

Pumpkin Custard

  • 11/2 Cups fresh pumpkin puree (if frozen defrost it first)
  • 1 1/2 Cups fresh butternut squash puree (if frozen defrost it first)
  • 3/4 C sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  1. Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C) and cover a baking sheet with foil.  Place the unfilled pie crust on the baking sheet and set aside.
  2. In a sauce pan with high sides, mix the pumpkin and butternut squash purees.  Put this over a medium-high heat. and cook for about 20-25 minutes, stirring frequently, until most of the water has cooked off of the puree.  Do not rush this step, as too much water in the puree will affect the overall consistency and flavor of the custard.
  3. In a bowl, beat the eggs.  Add the milk and cream and beat together.
  4. Once the puree has gotten really thick, remove it from the heat and stir in the dry ingredients.  Make sure they are well combined.
  5. Add the egg-milk mixture and stir until it is all incorporated.
  6. Fill (but do not overfill) the pie crust.  If there is extra custard, you can bake it in a greased ramekin.
  7. Bake for 40 – 50 minutes, or until set.  Check the pie after 30 minutes.  If the crust is getting too brown, cover the edges only with foil.

This custard also makes great ice-cream.

Happy Thanksgiving and thank you for your continued support on this blog!

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