Living “La Vita Locale”

This summer I will be engaging in a new endeavor on my blog, “La Vita Locale” that will feature recipes for produce that is currently available in local farmer’s markets and my Community Supported Agriculture farm, Fernbrook Farm CSA. Some posts will include links to prior posts (why reinvent the wheel, right?) in order to give you the most options for your produce.

One of the projects I sometimes give my students when I teach the Politics of Food unit is to go grocery shopping with a parent and look for a list of items at a grocery store and a farmer’s market. The discussion we have after they do this activity is always compelling because they realize that phrases like “Fresh baked on Premises” does not mean made from scratch with whole foods ingredients. Baked on premises only means that they defrosted a pie and stuck it in the oven, baked it, let it cool, and put it in a box. They learn that the produce at some Farmer’s “markets” comes from Florida and California. There is nothing wrong with a store selling fruits and veggies from other states, but when there are “Jersey Fresh” banners festooning the market from one end to the other, there is an implication that the food is local. News flash: Oranges don’t grow in New Jersey. Neither do avocados.

The students soon come to realize that there are farmer’s markets and then there are Farmer’s Markets. The ones we have relegated to lower case “fm” are the ones where maybe 10% of what they have for sale is actually produced by the company or farm that is selling it. We understand that a farm may not bottle its own honey, or make its own salsa, and maybe they get those value-added products from another local source, but those things usually aren’t the bulk of what is available in the farm shop. How do you know what the farm actually grows? If it isn’t labeled “Smith Farm’s Own” or something like that, just ask. With the amount of publicity food is getting lately, with this big emphasis on “Fresh & Local,” it has become ever more important to ask questions, read labels, and not just take for granted that if the produce for sale is presented in a little basket that it came from a local farm source.

Then there are real Farmer’s Markets, like The Collingswood Farmer’s Market that I had the pleasure of visiting yesterday with my friend Cathy. On Saturday mornings, farmer’s come in and set up tables and sell produce.  This is one way to eat lower on the commodity chain: fewer steps between the producer/farmer and the consumer — you! Yesterday at the market I saw a lot of asparagus. It happens to be a great year for asparagus – we have been eating asparagus from our patch 2 or 3 times a week for the past few weeks. I didn’t buy any. But I did get wonderful organic strawberries from DanLynn Farms. My strawberries are just blushing, so I was pretty excited to have strawberries (and so were my children!). I also picked up amazing fresh mushrooms from Davidson’s Exotic Mushrooms. Most mushrooms from the grocery store are dried out, but until you have had a freshly harvested mushroom, you wouldn’t even know the difference.

photo 3But the fun story of the morning was running into a former Triton student, April, at the Treehouse Coffee Shop’s booth. They featured fresh-made lemonade (like right in front of my face) and a wide variety of baked goods, including a really excellent gluten-free brownie. They also carry salsa and jams produced by people in the community. The Treehouse is located in Audubon, NJ and hosts the Our Yards Farm CSA, which is run by Julie, a “graduate” of the apprentice program at my CSA! I love how small the world can be!

Back to those mushrooms! We were having grilled lamb, so we sautéed the mushrooms to serve along side:

  • 2 T butter
  • 1 pint of mushrooms
  • 1 T chopped shallot
  • 2-3 T white wine
  • 1 t chopped fresh sage
  • salt to taste

Cut the mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. Heat a cast iron skillet and melt the butter over medium heat. Add chopped shallot and cook until it is translucent. Add the mushrooms and sauté until they are golden. Deglaze the pan with the white wine. When the pan is dry, turn off the heat. Toss with chopped fresh sage. Salt to taste.

5 thoughts on “Living “La Vita Locale”

  1. That’s beautiful story-telling, Natalie. Thanks for the shout-out for Collingswood Farmers’ Market. We pride ourselves on delivering actual Jersey Fresh from actual Jersey farmers, and proud to be on your short list of “capital letter” Farmers’ Markets!

  2. Just stopping by to thank you for this post, Natalie, to express my eagerness for whatever you’re planning next, and to see if you get comments on your blog. It’s great to see Donna here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.